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Showing blog posts tagged with Liz Shuler

What Did Your Grandparents Teach You About Work?

What did your grandparents do for a living? What did your grandparents teach you about work? How did your grandparents work lives shape who you are today?

These are the questions asked by a new website launched in honor of Labor Day by Jobs With Justice called The Way They Worked.  And rather than providing readers with the answers, the site asks Americans to tell their stories and honor their grandparents and the lives they lived and the jobs they worked.

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White House Summit Focuses on Issues Important to Working Women and Families

White House Summit Focuses on Issues Important to Working Women and Families

More than 250 working women, along with AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Elizabeth Shuler, attended the White House Summit on Working Families on Monday to join with the president in calling for more family- and women-friendly workplace policies. There are some employers participating in the president's agenda to raise wages and improve working conditions, but Shuler and the AFL-CIO emphasize that the best path to most women workers seeing improvements is through collective action and bargaining. While the summit had a broad focus on issues important to working families, Shuler emphasized that workers talk to her about issues like raising wages, paid sick days, paid family leave, pay equality, flexible work practices, stability in scheduling and others.

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Beyond Summit, Sustained Focus Needed for Working Women and Families

Aisha Thurman makes tipped minimum wage as a server in Michigan and is a member of the Restaurant Opportunities Centers United.

Next week, people from all over the country will convene in Washington, D.C.—and many more will log in to participate virtually—at a White House Summit on Working Families. Under the banner of “creating a 21st century workplace that works for all Americans,” we’ll hear from businesses, economists, advocates, workers and, yes, labor leaders to discuss policy solutions that can make a difference in the lives of working families. It’s an important conversation, and I look forward to seeing great examples of companies that give their employees meaningful benefits, fathers who take family leave when a new baby arrives and communities coming together to support workers struggling to get by.

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Walmart Moms: ‘Their Fight Is Our Fight’

Our walmart photo

This an open letter from AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Elizabeth Shuler to the nation's working women.  

In a show of national unity, Walmart moms are walking off the job in stores throughout the country this week. After years of trying to support themselves and their families on wages that are too low, with schedules that rob them of full-time benefits and an employer who fires co-workers who audaciously ask for more pay, they have had enough.

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Young People Understand Unions Can Solve Problems

Image via Working America

The National Labor Relations Board’s Chicago regional director issued a notable finding last week: Football players at Northwestern University are employees of the university for purposes of federal labor law. The legal finding, however, is the result of something even more striking. The overwhelming majority of the talented young men who have been awarded scholarships to play on the Northwestern football team expressed their desire to be represented by a union. And they turned to the College Athletes Players Association to file a petition with the NLRB asking for an election to bargain collectively with the university. 

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Ruben Jones and Why We Need a $10.10 Minimum Wage

Ruben Jones is a man closer to the age where he should be thinking about retirement, contrary to the "teens who don't need the money" stereotype of minimum  and low-wage workers, and makes $8.00 working at a Golden Corral location in the Washington, D.C., area. He's worked for the company over the past five years without seeing a raise. He has two children and four grandchildren who live in Ocean City, Md., who he can't visit because he can't afford to make the trip. Ruben works hard every day, but he lives at home with his mother and grandmother because his low wages, even though they are above the minimum wage, aren't enough for him to get his own apartment. 

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Global Labor Unions Lead the Fight to Advance Rights and Equality for Working Women

ICYMI, the United Nations this month examined women's equality worldwide and invited some special guests (including AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Elizabeth Shuler) to discuss ways to improve the lives of working women across the globe. 

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Trumka, Shuler, Gebre Elected to Lead AFL-CIO

AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka, Secretary-Treasurer Elizabeth Shuler and Executive Vice President Tefere Gebre.

Delegates to the 2013 AFL-CIO Convention today elected a trio of top officers to lead the labor movement to become, said re-elected AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka, “the movement America needs us to be and we must be.”

AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Elizabeth Shuler was elected to a second term and, in a classic American success story, Tefere Gebre, a 45-year-old Ethiopian political refugee who immigrated to the United States as a teenager, was elected executive vice president.

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What’s So Great About Unions, Anyway?

Photo from the AFL-CIO website feature Taxi! Taxi! by Robert Struckman

Let’s be honest. Sometimes, outside of election campaign seasons, even progressives wonder what’s so great about unions. Sure, we had a role to play before job safety laws, the eight-hour day, Social Security and civil rights laws were passed. But today?  

Even our friends aren’t immune to the relentless attacks on unions from the right and the stereotypes that come with them: union thugs, lazy workers, relics of the past, self-absorbed, yadda, yadda, yadda.

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MomsRising Blog Carnival: Make FMLA’s Promise Real—Together

Photo courtesy of Women Unemployed's Facebook page.

Today, let’s celebrate 20 years of the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA). Since 1993, the FMLA has been used more than 100 million times, helping 35 million people keep their jobs and health insurance while caring for a family health crisis or a new baby. That’s truly something to celebrate.

But this groundbreaking law didn’t just pop into our lives in 1993. A committed community of activists—women’s groups, union members, faith allies, family advocates and more—worked together for nine years to win it.

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