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Showing blog posts tagged with unemployed

‘It’s So Hard to Care About Anything Anymore’: Confessions of Unemployed Workers

Photo, via Whisper

Just in case folks need a reminder, being unemployed really sucks. On top of the stress of not knowing how you’re going to pay rent or afford to eat, you feel isolated from your friends and family. Most people get that being out of work is no picnic, but Sen. Mark Kirk (R-Ill.) needs a refresher. Kirk voted twice against extending emergency jobless benefits, which is crazy when you consider more than 99,000 Illinoisans have lost this lifeline.

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What We're Reading Today: Tuesday News Roundup

Photo via Doviende/Flickr

Here are some headlines from the working families news we're reading today (after the jump).

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What Can We Learn from the Long-Term Unemployed in the New York City Metro Area?

Photo via Wikimedia.

Among the problems that we as a nation have been grappling with since the end of the Great Recession, which ended in 2009, is the persistence of unemployment or, more specifically, long-term unemployment. It has been commonplace to assume that long-term unemployment is because of structural change, which has resulted in a skills mismatch. There is no question that structural changes in the economy mean that jobs that were eliminated—because of shocks from the financial crisis, which led to downturns in the business cycle—are not coming back. But this may assume too much. On the contrary, the principal issue is the depth of the recession, which has led to a severe decrease in aggregate demand for goods and services.

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‘Jobless Need Not Apply’ Signs Coming Down in NYC

‘Jobless Need Not Apply’ Signs Coming Down in NYC

One of the ugliest side effects of the most severe economic downturn since the Great Depression is the continuing practice among many employers of refusing to consider applications of job seekers who are unemployed.  

But the New York City Council yesterday overwhelmingly (44-4) passed a bill that prohibits discrimination against the unemployed in hiring.

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Tell Us What You Think: What’s Wrong With the U.S. Economy? The Real Scoop

This is the first of a four-part series describing what went wrong with America’s economy and how to fix it. See Part 2 tomorrow—and please leave a comment to tell us what you think. (Click the chart to enlarge.)

The Great Recession officially ended more than three years ago, but working families know there’s still something wrong with the U.S. economy.  If we want to fix our economy, we first have to understand what’s wrong with it. (Click chart on the left to enlarge). 

Starting today, in a series of four posts and infographics, we’ll spell out what we see as the short-term and long-term causes of our economic problems and we’ll point to specific solutions.

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1 Job for Every 3.4 Jobless Workers—Skills Shortage Isn't the Problem

Republicans in Congress and the Beltway pundits who parrot them like to say the nation's unemployment crisis is in large part due to workers' lack of skills.

Once again, a new report shows they are wrong.

Data out yesterday show that although the number of jobs is increasing, there still are far fewer jobs per worker available.

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Decline of Good Jobs Tied to Workers’ Decreased Bargaining Power

Many U.S. workers don’t have jobs—nearly 13 million. Less known, however, is that many more don’t have good jobs—fewer than one-quarter of America’s workforce, according to a new report from the Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR). The center defines a good job as one that pays at least $18.50 an hour, or $37,000 per year, equal to the inflation-adjusted earnings of the typical male worker in 1979.  A good job also includes employer-provided health insurance and a retirement plan (click on chart at left to expand).

The lack of available good jobs is not new. As CEPR finds, compared with 1979, the U.S. economy has lost about one-third (28 percent to 38 percent) of its capacity to generate good jobs.

But why?

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Fewer Available Jobs for Workers in April

Whether a blip or a (bad) new trend, data showing the number of U.S. job seekers is rising, compared with jobs available, should light a fire under Republicans in Congress to move a jobs creation package.

New data released today show the Job-Seekers Ratio increased in April to 3.7 workers for every 1 job from March’s ratio of 3.4 workers for every one job. 

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In North Carolina, Working America Stands Up for the Unemployed

In the midst of a terrible jobs crisis, there are those in North Carolina who seek to cut assistance for those who have lost their jobs. That’s just plain wrong.

Currently, North Carolina’s Chamber of Commerce seeks to restrict unemployment benefits by reducing the maximum weekly income from $506 to $350. In addition to the monetary cut, the time allowed to receive benefits could be reduced from 26 weeks to 20 weeks. The restriction of unemployment benefits will devastate hundreds of thousands of families who are actively looking for work.

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Young Workers Struggle to Find Jobs, Pay Student Debt

Campus Progress

"For Most Graduates, a Grueling Job Hunt Awaits," The Wall Street Journal writes today. Over the weekend, the New York Times sounded the alarm about employers' growing use of unpaid internships in fields that typically have never exploited free labor.

So, how bad is it for young workers?

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