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Showing blog posts tagged with job safety

Huhtamaki Workers Stand Up for Safe Working Conditions at California Paper Products Plant

Waterville Huhtamaki workers show their support.

That Starbucks cup that held your morning skim latte or the Chinet paper plates you’ve got packed up for a picnic this weekend were likely made by workers at one of Huhtamaki’s 21 plants in the United States, where more than 3,500 people work for the global Finnish packaging and paper products corporation.

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The State of America's Deadly Jobs, in 9 Charts

The State of America's Deadly Jobs, in 9 Charts

At The Huffington Post, Alissa Scheller has an article that includes nine charts that show very clearly the key takeaways from the AFL-CIO's recent Death on the Job report.  These charts explore the issue of who the 4,600 who die on the job each year are and what is contributing to their deaths.

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Innovation @Work: The Nose Knows

Innovation @Work: The Nose Knows

The latest post in our Innovation @Work section takes a look at a successful, and growing, program in Chicago that helps screen firefighters for cancer—using trained Canadian dogs.

The firehouse dog has long kept watch over the fire trucks (and, before that, fire horses) and has been the faithful companion riding alongside the firefighters on their way to save lives. But now dogs are being used in an innovative way to save the lives of the firefighters.

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The Pope Wants Us to Do Better: Winners and Losers of the Week

Photo courtesy the Catholic Church of England on Flickr

In our regular weekly feature, we'll be taking a look at the winners and losers of the week in the struggle for the rights of working families. The winners will be the people or organizations that go above and beyond to expand or protect the rights of working families, while the losers will be whoever went above and beyond to limit or deny those rights.

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Today’s Death Toll: 150 Workers

Today’s Death Toll, 150 Workers, Tomorrow’s 150 Workers....

Despite significant advancements in workplace health and safety over the past four decades, 150 people will be killed on the job or die from job-related illnesses and diseases today, reports the 2014 edition of the AFL-CIO’s annual Death on the Job: The Toll of Neglect, released this morning.

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Workers Memorial Day: Honor the Dead, Fight Like Hell for the Living

Workers Memorial Day: Honor the Dead, Fight Like Hell for the Living

Today is the 25th annual Workers Memorial Day, and around the country workers, workplace safety activists and community and faith leaders are honoring the men and women killed on the job and renewing their commitment to continuing the campaign for strong job safety laws and tough enforcement of those laws.

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Labor’s OIG ‘Concerned’ About Safety Agencies’ Resources

September 1908 coal miners in Gary, W. Va./wikimedia

In its semi-annual report, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Inspector General (OIG) says it is concerned that the two key federal agencies charged with protecting workers’ health and safety have the resources and ability to meet their workplace safety obligations.

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New Online OSHA Whistle-Blower Site Protects Workers from Retaliation

New Online OSHA Whistle-Blower Site Protects Workers from Retaliation

Workers who have been retaliated against or fear they will be for reporting unsafe and dangerous conditions and other violations of some 22 federal statutes to their employers can now go to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA's) new whistle-blower site to file complaints.

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Immigrant, Latino Construction Workers at Bigger Risk of Death from Falls

Photo  by Ron Cogswell, Flickr/Creative Commons

A disproportionate number of Latinos and immigrants are disproportionately killed in fall accidents in New York, according to a new study by the Center for Popular Democracy, because they work in construction in relatively high numbers; are concentrated in smaller, nonunion firms; and are over-represented in the contingent labor pool.

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Up Late with Alec Baldwin and the Workers Defense Project

MSNBC’s new Friday late night show “Up Late with Alec Baldwin” recently featured an in-depth interview with Cristina Tzintzún, executive director of the Workers Defense Project (WDP). She explained the hardships and abuses immigrant workers face, especially undocumented construction workers in Texas, and some of the successes—such as the recent wage and job safety protections approved last month by the Austin City Council—WDP has seen.

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