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Showing blog posts tagged with Death on the Job

Workplace Violence: Not Part of the Job

Workplace Violence: Not Part of the Job

Violence on the job is a serious and widespread safety and health problem for millions of working people. Workplace violence is the second leading cause of job-related death in the United States and is responsible for an increasing number of serious injuries. The rate of injuries stemming from workplace violence has increased over the last several decades, while the overall rate for job injuries has declined.

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Hey, T-Mobile, The Word Voice Doesn't Mean What You Seem to Think It Does: Winners and Losers of the Week

Pic of T-Mobile CEO John Legere via Wikimedia Commons

Each week, we take a look at the biggest friends and foes of labor. We celebrate the workers winning big and small battles, and we shame the companies or people trying to deny working people their rights.

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150 Workers Will Die Today

150 Workers Will Die Today

Despite significant advancements in workplace health and safety in the 44 years since the Occupational Safety and Health Act become law, today and every day 150 people will be killed on the job or die from job-related illnesses and diseases. That and other sobering statistics about the preventable deaths and injuries workers face each day are in the 2015 edition of the AFL-CIO’s annual Death on the Job: The Toll of Neglect released today.

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Today’s Death Toll: 150 Workers

Today’s Death Toll, 150 Workers, Tomorrow’s 150 Workers....

Despite significant advancements in workplace health and safety over the past four decades, 150 people will be killed on the job or die from job-related illnesses and diseases today, reports the 2014 edition of the AFL-CIO’s annual Death on the Job: The Toll of Neglect, released this morning.

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Conviction in Workers’ Deaths Brings Up to 20 Years for Gunpowder Plant Owner

Photo by derkeskey/Flickr

Company owners and executives who violate federal workplace safety standards that result in serious worker injuries or death seldom face criminal charges and are even more infrequently convicted. But last week, the owner of a New Hampshire gunpowder plant, where two workers were killed in a 2010 explosion, was sentenced to 10 to 20 years in prison on manslaughter charges.

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Daily Job Death Toll: 150 Workers

Photo Illustration by Tomswift46/Flickr

Today, 150 people will likely be killed on the job or die from job-related illnesses and disease. That deadly toll will continue tomorrow and the next day and the next until the nation “renews the commitment to protect workers from injury, disease and death,” and makes it a high priority, says the 2013 edition of the AFL-CIO’s Death on the Job: The Toll of Neglect.

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28-Year Inspection Gap at Deadly Texas Fertilizer Plant ‘Stunning Indictment’ of OSHA’s Underfunding

Photo by Ron Heflin, Greenpeace. Reposted with permission. www.greenpeace.org

The West, Texas, fertilizer plant, where a fire and explosion last week claimed at least 14 lives—including 11 firefighters and EMTs—and injured more than 200, was last inspected by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in 1985.

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13 Workers Killed Each Day on the Job in 2010

Springfield & Central Illinois Trades & Labor Council Honored Killed and Injured Workers at this memorial.

Each day in 2010, 13 workers on average were killed on the job—some 4,690 workers—and an estimated 50,000 died from occupational diseases, according to the AFL-CIO's annual report, “Death on the Job: The Toll of Neglect.” Released today, the report shows the number of those who died in 2010 (the most recent year for which data are available) is up from the 4,551 people who perished in 2009. This trend has continued since 2004, the first year in a decade that saw the number of deaths on the job increase.

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Workers Memorial Day: Honor the Dead with a Fight for Safe Jobs

Photo by Sara Wallenfang

In hundreds of Workers Memorial Day ceremonies across the country, working families are honoring workers who have died or been hurt on the job and carrying on the fight for safe workplaces. (Click here to find an event near you.) David Michaels, director of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), says: 

Making a living shouldn’t include dying.

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